Work productivity loss in breast cancer survivors and its effects on quality of life

Shaxin Liu, Fengyi Wang, Qiong Yang, Quan Wang, Danling Feng, Yue Chen, Andy S.K. Cheng (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Return to work is an important process for many breast cancer survivors (BCSs) that acts as a positive step towards their reintegration into society. OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether work productivity loss due to presenteeism could predict the quality of life (QOL) of employed BCSs. METHODS: This study used a cross-sectional design. Seventy-five BCSs and seventy-five participants in the Non-Cancer Comparison (NCC) group were surveyed. The main outcome measures were productivity loss (as measured by the Work Limitations questionnaire) and quality of life (as measure by the European Organization for Research and Treatment Quality of Life questionnaire C30). Other measures included psychological distress (as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and cognitive limitation at work (as measured by the Cognitive Symptom Checklist). RESULTS: The BCS group had a lower summary score, a lower global health related score and greater work limitation in all domains than the NCC group. The productivity loss due to presenteeism of the BCS group was 8%. The multiple regression model shows that work productivity loss and level of job stress were the significant predictors of quality of life in the BCS group. CONCLUSION: These findings raise questions about the effects of level of job stress and work productivity loss on the QOL of BCSs. Longitudinal studies are needed to map these relationships.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)199-207
Number of pages9
JournalWork
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Sep 2021

Keywords

  • job stress
  • Presenteeism
  • return to work
  • work flexibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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