Validation of the Hong Kong chinese version of the support person's unmet needs survey-short form

Yin Ping Leung, Y.-P. Choy, W.-M. Ling, E. Yim, W.K.W. So, C.W.H. Chan, Yim Wah Mak

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.This study describes the psychometric properties of a Hong Kong Chinese version of the short form of the Support Person's Unmet Needs Survey (SPUNS-SF) for caregivers of patients with cancer. A convenience sample of 280 patient-caregiver dyads was recruited between April and June 2018. A subsample of 70 caregivers completed the survey again, two weeks later. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) examined the instrument's factorial structure, ordinal alpha coefficients evaluated the internal consistency, and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) assessed the test-retest reliability. Convergence validity was evaluated by the correlations with sleep disturbance and caregiver burden in caregivers. The Hong Kong Chinese version of the SPUNS-SF (SPUNS-SFHKC) had a high completion rate of 96.8% (271/280) among caregivers. The original five-factor model provided an acceptable fit with the data in the CFA. The ordinal alpha coefficients were 0.866-0.945, and the two-week test-retest reliabilities were 0.524-0.678. The correlations of the five domains of the SPUNS-SFHKC with caregiver burden were 0.257-0.446, and for sleep disturbance were 0.075-0.464. The SPUNS-SFHKC has a suitable factor structure and psychometric properties for use in assessing unmet supportive needs among Chinese caregivers of patients with cancer. The applicability of the instrument for long-term use still needs to be studied.
Original languageEnglish
Article number4103
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2019

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Caregiver
  • Chinese
  • Needs
  • SPUNS-SF

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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