Translation and Initial Validation of the Chinese (Cantonese) Brief 2-Way Social Support Scale for Use in People with Chronic Stroke

Tai Wa Liu, Sheung Mei Shamay Ng (Corresponding Author), Joshua Tsoh, Peiming Chen, Huan Xu, Wai Lung Wong, Mun Yee Mimi Tse

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Background. Social support is important for stroke rehabilitation. Conventionally, social support is evaluated from the level of support received. However, the bidirectional support hypothesis postulated that self-perceived social support is optimized if individuals provide and receive social support in a balanced manner. The Brief 2-Way Social Support Scale (Brief 2-Way SSS) is a social support instrument measuring the reciprocity of receiving and giving emotional and instrumental social support. Objective. (1) To translate and culturally adapt the English version of the Brief 2-Way SSS into Chinese (Cantonese) (Brief 2-Way SSS-C), (2) to report the results of validation of the Brief 2-Way SSS-C, and (3) to investigate the level of social support in people with stroke in Hong Kong. Methods. The Brief 2-Way SSS-C was produced following the standard forward-backward translation model. People with stroke (n=109) and age-matched controls (n=53) were recruited through a university-Affiliated neurorehabilitation laboratory. Results. The Brief 2-Way SSS-C demonstrated excellent content validity, acceptable to good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha of 0.74-0.88), and good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.76-0.81). There were no ceiling or floor effects, and the MDC95 across all subscales was 4. The Brief 2-Way SSS-C subscales had significant correlations with various health-related outcome measures. People with stroke had a lower level of social support than the age-matched healthy controls. Conclusions. The Brief 2-Way SSS-C is a culturally relevant, reliable, and valid outcome measure for the level of social support in community-dwelling people with stroke.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3511631
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jun 2022

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