The moderating effect of gender on the relationship between apprenticeship and self-employment: evidence from a developing country

Ibrahim Mohammed, Wassiuw Abdul Rahaman, Alexander Bilson Darku, William Baah-Boateng

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: This study aims to examine the association between apprenticeship training and self-employment and how gender moderates the association. Design/methodology/approach: Secondary data from the World Bank’s Skills Towards Employment and Productivity (STEP) survey on Ghana were analysed using a binary choice (logit regression) model. The STEP survey drew its nationally representative sample from the working-age population (15–64 years) in urban areas. Findings: After controlling for several factors identified in the literature as determinants of self-employment, the results indicate that completing apprenticeship training increases the likelihood of being self-employed. However, women who have completed apprenticeship training are more likely to be self-employed than men. Originality/value: By examining the moderating effect of gender on the association between apprenticeship training and self-employment, this study has offered new evidence that policymakers can use to promote self-employment, especially among women, to reduce the entrepreneurial gap between men and women.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2023

Keywords

  • Informal training
  • Learning-by-doing
  • Moderated relationship
  • TVET
  • Youth unemployment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Strategy and Management
  • Marketing

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