The Managerial Gaze: The Long Tail of Tourism Education and Research

David Airey, John Tribe, Pierre Benckendorff, Honggen Xiao

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tourism has been studied and researched in higher education for more than 40 years and in many ways it has now established itself as a significant part of the academy. However, at a time of change and rationalization in higher education, tourism, along with other areas of study, needs to be able to justify its position. Increasingly, academic managers are seeking such justifications, often using readily available metrics. The purpose of this study is to examine the position of tourism using these same metrics, for teaching, research, and impact and for three different countries, Australia, China, and the United Kingdom. In doing so, it highlights tourism’s strengths and weaknesses from a managerial perspective but at the same time it exposes the relative narrowness of this managerial gaze. It points to the need for the tourism community to strengthen its provision and broaden the gaze of the decision makers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-151
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Travel Research
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Mar 2015

Keywords

  • impact
  • managerial gaze
  • performance
  • quality
  • research
  • teaching and learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Transportation
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

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