The Experience of Korean Immigrant Women Adjusting to Canadian Society

Jaeyoung Choi, Kaysi E. Kushner, Judy Mill, Wing Leung Lai

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The acculturation process is an important factor in the experience of all immigrants. Although previous studies have indicated the challenges faced by Korean immigrants, little attention has been paid to Korean women's immigration experiences. A focused ethnography was used to examine midlife and older Korean immigrant women's experiences following their immigration to Canada. Fifteen women were interviewed in a city in Western Canada. The findings showed that in coming to Canada, women focused on caring for their children and often sacrificed their personal dreams. They had to be employed to support their families, and received support from family and government. Women participated regularly in a Korean Church and drew on their Christian faith to ease their adjustment. They retained hopes for the future including good health and a better life for their children. Most women indicated that it was difficult to integrate into Canadian society but they never gave up on their adjustment to a new culture. In this manuscript, the adjustment experience of the immigrant women is discussed in the context of an acculturation framework. The findings will enhance health professionals' awareness of adjustment patterns and associated challenges to Korean immigrant women's quality of life.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-297
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Berry's model
  • Canada
  • Employment
  • Focused ethnography
  • Korean immigrant women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this