The evolution of building regulations in Hong Kong

Research output: Chapter in book / Conference proceedingConference article published in proceeding or bookAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Building regulations have been enacted since 1841 when Hong Kong was ceded to Britain. Major enactments were the Ordinance for Buildings and Nuisances 1856, the Buildings Ordinance 1889, the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance 1903 and the Building Ordinance 1935. It is argued that much of the rationale behind the prevailing regulations today is obscure and likely to be obsolete in meeting the present day requirements. This paper investigates how the building regulations shaped the urban built environment and consequently change people's quality of life. The evolution of residential building development in Hong Kong for the previous 150 years is outlined and the rationale if any, for these changes of the building regulations is examined. In addition, this study aims to evaluate/measure the degree in which these changes in Building Regulations affect the built environment. For the purpose of this research, the author only concentrates on the regulations which have impact on the development potential of building sites.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of CRIOCM 2005 International Research Symposium on Advancement of Construction Management and Real Estate
PublisherChinese Research Institute of Construction Management
Pages56-65
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9623674910
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2005
EventInternational Research Symposium on Advancement of Construction Management and Real Estate, CRIOCM 2005 - Hangzhou, China
Duration: 30 Oct 20052 Nov 2005

Conference

ConferenceInternational Research Symposium on Advancement of Construction Management and Real Estate, CRIOCM 2005
Country/TerritoryChina
CityHangzhou
Period30/10/052/11/05

Keywords

  • Building control
  • Building regulations
  • Design
  • Law
  • Planning
  • Residential

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urban Studies
  • Architecture
  • Building and Construction
  • Business and International Management
  • Strategy and Management

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