The Effectiveness of Disaster Education for Undergraduate Nursing Students' Knowledge, Willingness, and Perceived Ability: An Evaluation Study

Maria Shuk Yu Hung, Stanley Kam Ki Lam, Meyrick Chum Ming Chow, Winnie Wing Man Ng, Oi Kiu Pau

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As future healthcare professionals, nursing students should possess the appropriate knowledge, skills, and positive attitude to respond to public health emergencies or disasters worldwide. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a disaster management training course at improving Hong Kong nursing students' disaster knowledge, willingness, and perceived ability. A mixed-method design using a single group with pre- and post-intervention comparisons followed by qualitative focus group interviews, was conducted. A 45-h disaster management training course with theoretical and practical inputs was conducted. A total of 157 students participated in and completed the pre- and post-intervention questionnaires. Positive significant results in disaster knowledge (t(156) = -8.12, p < 0.01, d = -0.84) and perceived ability (t(156) = -7.95, p < 0.01, d = -0.72) were found, but no substantial change in willingness to respond to disasters was observed. The participants expressed various concerns regarding their willingness to respond, which can be summarized and grouped as (1) personal risk perceptions, (2) contextual factors of the disaster events, and (3) organizational support. Incorporating disaster training into the tertiary education curricula for basic nursing professionals' training could be a long-term strategy to prepare and expand the competent workforce for future disasters. Government or healthcare organizations are recommended to provide strategies and adequate support to alleviate nursing professionals' concerns and enhance their willingness.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume18
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Oct 2021

Keywords

  • ability
  • disaster
  • knowledge
  • nursing students
  • training
  • willingness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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