The effectiveness of an integrated pain management program for older persons and staff in nursing homes

Mun Yee Mimi Tse, Sinfia Kuan Sin Vong, Suki S K Ho

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the effects of an 8-week integrated pain management program (IPMP) on enhancing the knowledge and attitude toward pain management among staff; and improving the pain, quality of life, physical and psychosocial functions, and use of non-drug therapies for the elderly in nursing homes. Nursing home staff (N= 147) and residents (N= 535) were recruited from ten nursing homes. Nursing homes were randomly assigned into an experimental group (N= 296) with IPMP or control group (N= 239) without IPMP. The IPMP consisted of pain education for staff and physical exercise and multisensory stimulation art and craft therapy for residents. Data were collected before and after the IPMP. The staff demonstrated a significant improvement in knowledge and attitude to pain management, with the survey score increasing from 8.46 ± 3.74 to 19.43 ± 4.07 (p< 0.001). Among the residents, 74% had experienced pain within the previous 6 months, with pain intensity of 4.10 ± 2.20. Those in the experimental group showed a significantly better reduction in pain scores than the control group, from 4.19 ± 2.25 to 2.67 ± 2.08 (p< 0.001). Group differences were also found in psychological well-being, including happiness, loneliness, life satisfaction and depression (p< 0.05), and the use of non-drug methods (p< 0.05). These results suggested that IPMP is beneficial for staff, and is effective in reducing geriatric pain and negative impacts. Management support and staff involvement in the program are important for its long-term continuation.
Original languageEnglish
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2012

Keywords

  • Integrated pain management program
  • Multisensory stimulation
  • Non-drug therapy
  • Nursing home resident
  • Physical exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Health(social science)
  • Gerontology

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