The changing nature of industrial design: Towards product-service systems

Cornelis Joachim Petrus Maria de Bont

Research output: Chapter in book / Conference proceedingConference article published in proceeding or bookAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Long before academia existed, people were capable of developing tools and products relevant for survival. With the start of the industrial revolution, products more commonly started to be produced in series. Initially, the available knowledge and expertise to build upon came from mechanical engineering. Later, industrial design started to borrow from other fields as well such as: architecture, social sciences (psychology, sociology) and economics. Over time, many societal and technical developments took place that affected the nature and the direction of industrial design. We will discuss the impact of megatrends and the shift from product design towards the design of product-service systems. Philips as a leading company in product innovation and the Dutch design sector preparing for the future, will serve as a basis for examples to illustrate changes in the field.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering, TMCE 2010
Pages19-26
Number of pages8
Volume1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event8th International Symposium on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering, TMCE 2010 - Ancona, Italy
Duration: 12 Apr 201016 Apr 2010

Conference

Conference8th International Symposium on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering, TMCE 2010
CountryItaly
CityAncona
Period12/04/1016/04/10

Keywords

  • Academic discipline
  • Design practice
  • Impact of design
  • Industrial design
  • Megatrends
  • New challenges
  • Product-service systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this