Studies on detachment behavior of micron sized droplets: A comparison between pure fluid and nanofluid

S. C. Fu, Y. S. Cheung, H. H. Lee, Joseph K.C. Kwan, Christopher Y.H. Chao

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Resuspension is considered as a source of indoor air pollutants. These airborne pollutants can be in the form of liquid or solid. It has been previously found that the detachment mechanism of liquid droplets is different from the solid particles on the poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surface. Liquid droplets detach by portion when they are under an increasing normal force field while droplets detach completely when under a tangential force field. In this research, droplet detachment experiments are extended to different substrate materials, which are PMMA, glass, and stainless steel by the means of centrifuge. Also, the differences in detachment between pure glycerol-water (pure fluid) and a glycerol solution with the addition of nanoparticles (nanofluid) are investigated under different substrate materials. It is found that liquid droplets, again, detach by portion under normal force for all the substrate materials. For tangential force, the droplets detach completely if the exerted force was sufficiently large and the threshold values are material dependent, which is further elaborated by retention theory. After the addition of nanoparticles, a higher removal force was required compared to the droplets of pure fluid within the same size range. Also, solid residues with a negligible amount of fluid were found on the substrate after each removal of droplets under both normal and tangential force. The involvement of nanoparticles could be the pioneer work for future studies on commonly found liquid pollutants, which are prone to be contaminated by solid particles, such as in salivary excretion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-77
Number of pages9
JournalAerosol Science and Technology
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Pollution

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