Soliciting social support from migrant domestic workers’ connections to storytelling networks during a public health crisis

Jeffry Oktavianus, Wan-Ying Lin

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Guided by communication infrastructure theory and social support theory, this study scrutinizes how the storytelling networks of marginalized communities, particularly migrant domestic workers (MDWs), provided social support amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Data obtained from in-depth interviews with 32 Indonesian MDWs in Hong Kong revealed that the community storytelling networks, comprising interpersonal relationships, community organizations, and media outlets, played an essential role in assisting the coping efforts of MDWs during the pandemic. These storytelling networks offered various types of social support, including informational, emotional, and instrumental or tangible assistance. However, these connections to the storytelling networks were also sources of the spread of misinformation. Theoretical and practical implications are further discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1179-1188
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Communication
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2023
Externally publishedYes

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