Sleep disruption and its contributing factors in Chinese survivors of childhood cancer: A cross-sectional study

K. Y. Ho, Katherine K.W. Lam, W. Xia, S. Y. Chiu, Godfrey C.F. Chan

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study provided information about sleep disruption, particularly its prevalence and severity among Hong Kong Chinese childhood cancer survivors. Additionally, we identified the factors influencing sleep disruption and explored how fatigue, depressive symptoms and physical activity (PA) affect sleep disruption. Methods: Four hundred two survivors 6–18 years old and 50 age- and gender-matched healthy counterparts were assessed for depressive symptoms, fatigue, PA and subjective sleep quality. Demographic and clinical information were collected. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify any factors contributing to poor sleep. Results: Mean scores of depressive symptoms, fatigue for children and that for adolescents, and PA in survivors were 16.1 (SD = 11.1), 24.6 (SD = 10.3), 27.7 (SD = 7.8), and 3.08 (SD = 2.9), respectively. 44.8% of the survivors were poor sleepers, which was more that in healthy counterparts. The three most common sleep problem were prolonged sleep latency (31.9%), daytime dysfunction (23.4%), and sleep disturbance (22.9%). The time since last treatment (children: AOR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.30–0.96, p = 0.04; adolescents: AOR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.70–0.92, p < 0.01) and PA levels (children: AOR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.260–0.82, p = 0.01; adolescents: AOR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.49–0.98, p = 0.04) were negatively associated with sleep disruption, while depressive symptoms (children: AOR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.04–1.64, p = 0.02; adolescents: AOR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01–1.13, p = 0.03), fatigue (children: AOR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.00–1.31, p = 0.04; adolescents: AOR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.02–1.15, p = 0.01), number of treatment received (children: AOR = 16.56, 95% CI = 1.27–216.82, p = 0.03; adolescents: AOR = 7.30, 95% CI = 2.36–22.56, p < 0.01), and co-sleeping (children: AOR = 29.19, 95% CI = 1.65–511.57, p = 0.02; adolescents: AOR = 4.63, 95% CI = 1.22–17.61, p = 0.02) were positively associated with sleep disruption. Conclusion: Physical activity made the largest contribution to reduce sleep disruption. It is crucial to advocate for the adoption and maintenance of PA in survivorship.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPsycho-Oncology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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