Sensory organization of balance control in children with developmental coordination disorder

Shirley S.M. Fong, Velma Y.L. Lee, Marco Yiu Chung Pang

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to (1) compare functional balance performance and sensory organization of postural control between children with and without developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and (2) determine the association between postural control and participation diversity among children with DCD. We recruited 81 children with DCD and 67 typically developing children. Balance was evaluated with the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 (Movement ABC-2). Participation patterns were evaluated using the Children Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment assessment. Analysis of variance was used to compare outcome variables between the two groups. A multiple regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between participation diversity and balance performance in children with DCD. The DCD group had significantly lower Movement ABC-2 balance scores, SOT-derived equilibrium scores, and sensory ratios than the control group (p<0.05). However, only the Movement ABC-2 balance score was significantly associated with participation diversity in children with DCD. After accounting for the effects of age and gender, Movement ABC-2 balance score remained significantly associated with participation diversity, explaining 10.9% of the variance (Fchange1,77=9.494, p=0.003). Children with DCD demonstrate deficits in sensory organization of balance control. This suboptimal balance ability contributes to limited participation in activities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2376-2382
Number of pages7
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2011

Keywords

  • Activity
  • Clumsy children
  • Postural control
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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