Self-perceived role and function of christian prison chaplains and buddhist volunteers in Hong Kong Prisons

Wing Hong Chui, Kevin Kwok Yin Cheng

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although there have been a handful of studies examining the work of chaplains and prison volunteers in a Western setting, few have endeavored to conduct research into the experiences of religious workers in Asian penitentiaries. To fill this gap, this article reports on exploratory research examining the work of a selected group of religious workers in Hong Kong prisons. A total of 17 religious workers were interviewed: 10 prison chaplains and 7 Buddhist volunteers who paid regular prison visits. Qualitative findings generated from in-depth interviews present three themes: the range of religious activities performed, the importance of religion for the rehabilitation of inmates, and the hope of continued religious support to prisoners after discharge. The significance of this research is that it sheds light on the understudied work of prison chaplains and volunteers in Hong Kong and portrays the difference between the works of the Christian ministry and Buddhist volunteers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-168
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Buddhism
  • Christianity
  • Hong Kong
  • prison
  • religious workers
  • volunteers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology

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