Review on the use of Fresnel prism in low vision

Research output: Chapter in book / Conference proceedingConference article published in proceeding or bookAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Fresnel prisms are often prescribed for visual field defects in low vision patients. These prisms are made of optical polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and this material increases chromatic dispersion and produces a loss of contrast. In this presentation, the effect of chromatic dispersion on contrast sensitivity is determined. It has been verified that loss of contrast sensitivity is greater at higher spatial frequencies with Fresnel prisms than with glass prisms of the same power. Above 10 prism diopters, Fresnel prisms reduce both contrast sensitivity and visual acuity substantially. However, low vision patients with visual field losses appear not to be affected due to their sometimes very low remaining contrast sensitivity and visual acuity. In the presence of both blurred and diplopic vision, a case report indicating the use of prisms in alleviating diplopia caused by trauma is presented. In spite of a reduction in visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, the patient preferred to have the Fresnel prism on his spectacle lenses for distance viewing. Diplopia appeared to cause more annoyance than the reduction of acuity and contrast sensitivity due to the Fresnel prism.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherPubl by Int Soc for Optical Engineering
Pages248-253
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)0819407909
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 1992
Externally publishedYes
EventOphthalmic Technologies II - Los Angeles, CA, USA
Duration: 19 Jan 199221 Jan 1992

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume1644
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Conference

ConferenceOphthalmic Technologies II
CityLos Angeles, CA, USA
Period19/01/9221/01/92

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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