Psychological effects of COVID-19 on adults with aphasia and their caregivers: six-month consequences of COVID-19 lockdowns in Hong Kong

Anthony Pak-Hin Kong, Kai Yan Lau, Vivian Nga-Ying Chai

Research output: Chapter in book / Conference proceedingChapter in an edited book (as author)Academic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Aphasia is a neurological disorder caused by damage to the areas of the brain that are responsible for language processing. Apart from causing impairments in comprehension and expression across verbal, written, and signed modalities, aphasia has been reported to reduce one’s social engagement and, consequently, psychosocial well-being. This study investigated how COVID-19 lockdowns in Hong Kong had psychological effects on persons with aphasia (PWAs), their caregivers, and healthy adults and impacted their communication activities. A survey study was conducted using a 70-item questionnaire that collected information on participants’ knowledge about COVID-19, communication, and community involvement pre- and post-outbreak, and self-rated psychological well-being. Results indicated that all groups were affected in terms of their social engagement, but PWAs demonstrated more challenges in understanding the pandemic and were more psychosocially burdened. A subset of PWAs were re-interviewed two months after the initial interview, and their responses revealed changes in outdoor activity patterns and increased psychosocial distress. The implications of these findings for improving aphasia services are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCOVID-19 and Speech-Language Pathology
EditorsLouise Cummings
PublisherRouledge
Chapter11
Number of pages22
ISBN (Electronic)9781003257318
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Sep 2022

Publication series

NameRoutledge Research in Speech-Language Pathology
PublisherRoutledge

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Psychological effects of COVID-19 on adults with aphasia and their caregivers: six-month consequences of COVID-19 lockdowns in Hong Kong'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this