Preferences for end-of-life care and decision-making among Chinese community-dwelling older adults: A comparative cross-sectional study in Hong Kong and Wuhan in China

Hui Lin Cheng, Enid Kwong, Kitty Chan, Claudia Lai, Xin Xue Xi, Paul Lee

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to describe and compare end-of-life care and decision-making preferences among Chinese community-dwelling older adults between Wuhan and Hong Kong in China. The study adopted a cross-sectional correlation design and recruited a convenience sample of 259 older adults, aged ≥65 years old from five community centers in Wuhan and Hong Kong. Participants completed a validated structured questionnaire that measured their end-of-life care and decision-making preferences. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results showed that Wuhan participants were significantly more likely to view “trying every means to extend the life span” as very important/important; and they perceived “support from religious personnel” as unimportant/very unimportant. Different from those older adults in Hong Kong, the Wuhan participants significantly chose their home as the preferred place for end-of-life care and death. They also tended to prefer family members to enact the decision-maker role in end-of-life decision situations. The study suggests older adults in Hong Kong and Wuhan have some differences in preferences for end-of-life care and decision-making, which provides the basis for future development of culturally relevant community-based end-of-life care.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNursing and Health Sciences
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • community
  • culture
  • decision-making
  • end-of-life care
  • family care
  • older adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Nursing

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