Predictors of perceived satisfaction with parental control in chinese adolescents: A 3-year longitudinal study

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Abstract

Over three consecutive years, 2,559 Chinese adolescents (mean age = 12.65 years at Wave 1) responded to instruments assessing their trust of parents, perceived parental trust of the children, readiness to communicate with the parents, and satisfaction with parental control. Results showed that mutual trust between the parents and their adolescent children and the children's readiness to communicate with the parents were related to perceived satisfaction with parental control at Time 1, Time 2, and Time 3. Although readiness to communicate with the parents and mutual trust between the parents and their adolescent children predicted perceived satisfaction with parental behavioral control and its change over time, trust of the parent was the strongest predictor. While the influence of trust of the father on satisfaction with paternal control was stronger for adolescent girls than for adolescent boys, influence of paternal trust on satisfaction with paternal control was stronger for adolescent boys than for adolescent girls.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-164
Number of pages12
JournalAdolescence
Volume43
Issue number169
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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