Perceived parental control processes, parent—child relational qualities, and psychological well-being in chinese adolescents with and without economic disadvantage

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Abstract

The author assessed the relationships between poverty and perceived parenting style, parent-child relationships, and adolescent psychological well-being in Chinese secondary school students (N = 3, 017). Participants completed questionnaires designed to assess (a) the degree to which their parents used monitoring, discipline, and other techniques to control their behavior; (b) the extent to which their parents attempted to control them in a way that undermined their psychological development; (c) the parent-child relational qualities, such as the child's readiness to communicate with the parents and perceived mutual trust; and (d) the child's psychological well-being. Although adolescents with economic disadvantage did not differ from adolescents without economic disadvantage on the maternal variables (except on parental knowledge and parental monitoring), adolescents whose families were receiving public assistance generally perceived paternal behavioral control and father-child relational qualities to be more negative than did adolescents who were not receiving public assistance. The author found psychological well-being (shown by hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction, self-esteem) of adolescents experiencing economic disadvantage to be weaker than that of adolescents not experiencing economic disadvantage.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-188
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Genetic Psychology
Volume166
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chinese adolescents
  • Economic disadvantage
  • Parent-child relational qualities
  • Parental control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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