Perceived Information Distortion about COVID-19 Vaccination and Addictive Social Media Use among Social Media Users in Hong Kong: The Moderating Roles of Functional Literacy and Critical Literacy

Luyao Xie, Edmund W.J. Lee, Vivian W.I. Fong, Kam Hei Hui, Meiqi Xin (Corresponding Author), Phoenix K.H. Mo (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

During the COVID-19 pandemic, distorted information about the COVID-19 vaccination is widely disseminated through social media. The present study examined the association between perceived information distortion about COVID-19 vaccination on social media, individuals' functional and critical literacy, and addictive social media use (SMU), as well as the moderating roles of functional and critical literacy in the association between perceived information distortion and addictive SMU among social media users in Hong Kong. A web-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted among 411 Chinese citizens from June to August 2021. Findings showed that after adjusting for significant background variables, including age, gender, marital status, education, occupation, and income, functional literacy was negatively associated with addictive SMU. In addition, significant moderation effects of functional literacy and critical literacy were also observed, such that a positive association between perceived information distortion on social media and addictive SMU was significant among participants with lower functional literacy or higher critical literacy. Findings highlight the importance of improving functional literacy in addictive SMU prevention for social media users. Special attention should also be paid to the potential influence of critical literacy on addictive SMUs.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8550
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume19
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jul 2022

Keywords

  • addictive social media use
  • COVID-19
  • critical literacy
  • functional literacy
  • perceived information distortion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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