Patient–Proxy Agreement Regarding Health-Related Quality of Life in Survivors with Lymphoma: A Propensity-Score Matching Analysis

Richard Huan Xu, Dong Dong (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To assess the difference between lymphoma survivors’ self-and proxy-reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and its association with socioeconomic and health statuses. Methods: The data used in this study were obtained from a nationwide cross-sectional online survey in 2019. Information about participants’ demographics, health status and HRQoL were collected. The propensity-score matching (PSM) method was used to control the effect of potential confounders on selection bias. A chi-squared test, one-way analysis of variance, and multiple linear regression models were used to assess the relationship between HRQoL and response type adjusted to respondents’ background characteristics. Results: Out of the total 4400 participants, data of 2350 ones were elicited for analysis after PSM process. Patients’ self-reported outcomes indicated a slightly better physical, role and emotional functioning than proxy-reported outcomes. Regression analysis showed that patients, who were older, unemployed, and who received surgery, were more likely to report a lower HRQoL. Further analysis demonstrated that proxy-reported patients who had completed treatment were more likely to report a higher HRQoL than those who were being treated. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that the agreement between self-and proxy-reported HRQoL is low in patients with lymphoma and the heterogeneities of HRQoL among patients with different types of aggressive NHL (Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma) is large. Differences in self-and proxy-reported HRQoL should be considered by oncologists when selecting and deciding the optimal care plan for lymphoma survivors.

Original languageEnglish
Article number607
JournalCancers
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Health-related quality of life
  • Lymphoma
  • Patient–proxy agreement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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