Parent-adolescent trust and parent-adolescent relationships in Chinese families in Hong Kong: Implications for parent education and family therapy

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Abstract

On two occasions separated by one year, Chinese adolescents (N = 2,758) responded to instruments measuring their perceived parentadolescent trust (i.e., paternal trust of the child and the child's trust of the parent) and other dimensions of parent-child relational qualities (satisfaction with parental control, readiness to communicate with the parent, and global satisfaction with the parent-child relationship). Results showed that perceived parent-adolescent trust was concurrently and longitudinally related to other dimensions of parent-child relational qualities. Multiple regression analyses suggest that the relations between perceived parent-adolescent trust and different dimensions of parent-child relational qualities over time were bidirectional in nature. Relative to perceived paternal trust of the adolescent child, adolescent child's trust of their parents exerted a stronger influence on different dimensions of parentadolescent relational qualities, particularly in the father-adolescent dyad. While the influence of the child's readiness to communicate with the parents on parent-adolescent trust was weak in the father-adolescent dyad, the influence of global satisfaction with the parent-adolescent relationship on parent-adolescent trust was weak in the mother-adolescent dyad. The implications of the present findings on parent education and family therapy are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-265
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Journal of Family Therapy
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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