Numerical modeling of volatile organic compound emissions from ozone reactions with human-worn clothing in an aircraft cabin

Aakash C. Rai, Chao Hsin Lin, Qingyan Chen

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Volatile organic compounds are indoor air pollutants with many adverse health effects for humans. Ozone reactions with human surfaces (skin, hair, and clothing) are an important source of volatile organic compounds in the indoor air, especially in aircraft cabins because of their typically high ozone concentrations and occupant densities. Therefore, it is important to study the ozone-initiated volatile organic compound emissions from ozone reactions with passengers in an aircraft cabin and assess their resulting exposure. This investigation developed empirical models for computing the emissions of several major volatile organic compounds, including acetone, 4-oxopentanal, nonanal, and decanal, from ozone reactions with human-worn clothing. The empirical models were used to compute the contributions of human surfaces to these volatile organic compounds in an aircraft cabin mockup under different environmental conditions. The computed results were then compared with the corresponding experimental data obtained in the mockup. The models can provide rough estimates of ozone-initiated volatile organic compound concentrations. The empiricalmodels were integrated into a computational fluid dynamics analysis, and the results showed that the levels of ozone-initiated volatile organic compounds were significantly enhanced in the breathing zones of the passengers. Therefore, to accurately assess passenger exposure to volatile organic compounds, their concentrations in the breathing zones should be used.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)922-931
Number of pages10
JournalHVAC and R Research
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Building and Construction

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