Network discrimination against LGBTQ minorities in Taiwan after same-sex marriage legalization: A Goffmanian micro-sociological approach

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2019, the government of Taiwan legalized same-sex marriage, the first to do so in Asia. Yet, despite its celebration as a sign of liberal progress, legalization appears at odds with the results of referendums that show a majority of Taiwan citizens oppose LGBTQ acceptance, following a steady decline in tolerance for LGBTQ people in Taiwan. To explain this, this article adopts a Goffmanian micro-sociological approach to interrogate LGBTQ experiences of stigma and discrimination in their networks. Using narrative and go-along interviews with LGBTQ people in Kaohsiung, Taiwan in 2019, this article shows (1) latent forms of discrimination in families and at workplaces, (2) the intensification of discriminatory scrutiny within these spaces in the wake of legalization, (3) mental health consequences, and (4) social enclaves that offer some reprieve from discriminatory pressures. This article identifies a need for greater resource allocation to create safe spaces for members of the LGBTQ community and anti-discrimination policies to combat the capillary forms of discrimination that have arisen after same-sex marriage legalization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)594-618
Number of pages25
JournalCritical Asian Studies
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2022

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • East Asia
  • LGBTQ
  • stigma
  • vulnerable populations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

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