Moss-indoor vertical greenery system design protocol: Using moss as an indoor vertical greenery system in the tropics

Chen Wang, Heng Li, Sze A. Neoh

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Indoor vertical greenery systems (iVGSs) are usually linked to drawbacks such as high initial investment and maintenance costs, and possible damage to buildings. Plants may attract insects and mosquitoes, and some release excessive pollen if indoors. Moss gardening might be an alternative solution because bryophytes are environment friendly in conserving water, controlling erosion, filtering hazardous chemicals and rainwater, and sequestering carbon. The aim of this study is to develop a Moss-iVGS design protocol by considering the characteristics of a Moss-iVGS prototype, foliage thickness, and the influence of lighting on moss cultivation in the tropics. A mixed approach combining experiments and a questionnaire survey was adopted. Results show that Moss-iVGS can withstand 45 days of drought without any water supply or regular maintenance. The moss was able to absorb moisture from humid air to maintain its survival. Moss is abundant in nature, easy to maintain, has high aesthetic value, and has numerous environmental benefits in the long run. Conventional VGS drawbacks could be possibly solved or mitigated by Moss-iVGS. Not limited to a pattern, Moss-iVGS could have various types of design such as moss tile and moss carpet for indoor use. Different species of moss could be tested in various indoor environments in a further study to assist commercialization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)887-904
Number of pages18
JournalIndoor and Built Environment
Volume28
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019

Keywords

  • Design protocol
  • Indoor VGS
  • Moss-iVGS
  • Vertical greenery system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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