Mobile health application-based interventions to improve self-management of chemotherapy-related symptoms among people with breast cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy: A systematic review.

Nuo Shi, Kwan Ching Wong (Corresponding Author), Kam Yuet Wong, Liyan Sha

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Since the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been an increasing number of studies on using mobile health (mHealth) to support the
symptom self-management of patients with breast cancer (BC). However, the components of such programs remain unexplored. This systematic review aimed to identify the components of existing mHealth app-based interventions for patients with BC who are undergoing chemotherapy and to uncover self-efficacy enhancement elements from among them.

Methods: A systematic review was conducted for randomized controlled trials published from 2010 to 2021. Two strategies were used to
assess the mHealth apps: The Omaha System, a structured classification system for patient care, and Bandura’s self-efficacy theory, which
assesses sources of influence that determine an individual’s confidence in being able to manage a problem. Intervention components identified
in the studies were grouped under the 4 domains of the intervention scheme of the Omaha System. Four hierarchical sources of self-efficacy
enhancement elements were extracted from the studies using Bandura’s self-efficacy theory.

Results: The search uncovered 1,668 records. Full-text screening was conducted on 44 articles, and 5 randomized controlled trials (n = 537
participants) were included. Self-monitoring under the domain of “Treatments and procedure” was the most frequently used mHealth intervention for improving symptom self-management in patients with BC undergoing chemotherapy. Most mHealth apps used various “mastery
experience” strategies including reminders, self-care advice, videos, and learning forums.

Conclusion: Self-monitoring was commonly utilized in mHealth-based interventions for patients with BC undergoing chemotherapy. Our survey
uncovered evident variation in strategies to support self-management of symptoms and standardized reporting is required. More evidence is
required to make conclusive recommendations related to mHealth tools for BC chemotherapy self-management.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberoyac267
Pages (from-to)e175-e182
JournalOncologist
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Apr 2023

Keywords

  • applications
  • breast cancer
  • chemotherapy
  • mHealth
  • self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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