Microcystic corneal oedema associated with over-wear of decentred orthokeratology lenses during COVID-19 lockdown

Biyue Guo, Pauline Cho, Nathan Efron

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

The presence of small (15-50 μm), irregular-shaped microcysts
with defined borders in the corneal epithelial layer indicates
chronic corneal hypoxia during extended contact lens wear,1
but may also be observed in non-contact lens wearers with less
severity.2 They usually cause mild or no visual impairment.
Orthokeratology lenses reshape the corneal surface overnight
as a result of mechanical and fluid forces. While mild
microcysts have been reported in adult orthokeratology
wearers,3 they have not been observed in orthokeratology
studies on children, spanning 2–5 years.4–6
Presented here is a case of corneal oedema associated with
over-wear of decentred orthokeratology lenses in a child being
kept at home during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19)
pandemic.
Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical and Experimental Optometry
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Mar 2021

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • microcystic oedema
  • microcysts
  • orthokeratology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Optometry

Cite this