Measurement agreement between a newly developed sensing insole and traditional laboratory-based method for footstrike pattern detection in runners

Tsz Hei Cheung, Winko W. An, Ivan P.H. Au, Janet H. Zhang, Zoe Y.S. Chan, Alfred Man, Fannie O.Y. Lau, Melody K.Y. Lam, K. K. Lau, C. Y. Leung, N. W. Tsang, Louis K.Y. Sze, Gilbert W.K. Lam

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, dist ribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This study introduced a novel but simple method to continuously measure footstrike patterns in runners using inexpensive force sensors. Two force sensing resistors were firmly affixed at the heel and second toe of both insoles to collect the time signal of foot contact. A total of 109 healthy young adults (42 males and 67 females) were recruited in this study. They ran on an instrumented treadmill at 0°, +10°, and -10° inclinations and attempted rearfoot, midfoot, and forefoot landings using real time visual biofeedback. Intra-step strike index and onset time difference between two force sensors were measured and analyzed with univariate linear regression. We analyzed 25,655 footfalls and found that onset time difference between two sensors explained 80-84% of variation in the prediction model of strike index (R-squared = 0.799-0.836, p<0.001). However, the time windows to detect footstrike patterns on different surface inclinations were not consistent. These findings may allow laboratory- based gait retraining to be implemented in natural running environments to aid in both injury prevention and performance enhancement.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0175724
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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