Managing postmastectomy lymphedema with low-level laser therapy

Rufina W.L. Lau, Lai Ying Gladys Cheing

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We aimed to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in managing postmastectomy lymphedema. Background Data: Postmastectomy lymphedema (PML) is a common complication of breast cancer treatment that causes various symptoms, functional impairment, or even psychosocial morbidity. A prospective, single-blinded, controlled clinical trial was conducted to examine the effectiveness of LLLT on managing PML. Methods: Twenty-one women suffering from unilateral PML were randomly allocated to receive either 12 sessions of LLLT in 4?wk (the laser group) or no laser irradiation (the control group). Volumetry and tonometry were used to monitor arm volume and tissue resistance; the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire was used for measuring subjective symptoms. Outcome measures were assessed before and after the treatment period and at the 4?wk follow-up. Results: Reduction in arm volume and increase in tissue softening was found in the laser group only. At the follow-up session, significant between-group differences (all p?<?0.05) were found in arm volume and tissue resistance at the anterior torso and forearm region. The laser group had a 16% reduction in the arm volume at the end of the treatment period, that dropped to 28% in the follow-up. Moreover, the laser group demonstrated a cumulative increase from 15% to 33% in the tonometry readings over the forearm and anterior torso. The DASH score of the laser group showed progressive improvement over time. Conclusion: LLLT was effective in the management of PML, and the effects were maintained to the 4?wk follow-up.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)763-769
Number of pages7
JournalPhotomedicine and Laser Surgery
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this