Inactivation of vegetative cells, germinated spores, and dormant spores of Bacillus atrophaeus by pulsed electric field with fixed energy input

Wen Jie Wu, Jinhui Chang

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing the electric energy input during pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment is a straightforward technique to boost the efficiency of microbial inactivation. However, drawbacks such as electrode corrosion, arc formation, and high cost are also involved. This study aims to investigate the impact of medium conductivity ((Formula presented.)), electric field strength ((Formula presented.)), and the number of pulses ((Formula presented.)) on the inactivation of vegetative cells, germinated spores, and dormant spores of Bacillus atrophaeus with fixed energy input. Our results indicated that (1) vegetative cells were susceptible to PEF treatment, and the relative importance of (Formula presented.), (Formula presented.), and (Formula presented.) was (Formula presented.); (2) germinated spores were more resistant to PEF treatment than vegetative cells, and the relative importance of (Formula presented.), (Formula presented.), and (Formula presented.) was (Formula presented.); and (3) similar to the thermal resistance property, dormant spores were also highly resistant to PEF treatment and were not significantly inactivated in our experiment setting. It is concluded that the degree of PEF resistance of cell at different physiological states may be related to its structure and size. This study added to the body of knowledge on selecting PEF treatment settings and gave insight into the scaling up of PEF applications in the food processing industry. Practical Applications: In the food processing industry, eliminating contaminants such as bacterial spores is essential, and PEF processing is a common nonthermal technique. While the traditional method of increasing the electric energy input to increase microbial inactivation efficiency is beneficial, it is not cost-effective. The results of this investigation demonstrated that decreasing spore resistance through germination followed by parameter-optimized PEF treatments is a practical method for improving pasteurization efficiency. This novel technique might be used in the food sector.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13959
JournalJournal of Food Process Engineering
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • General Chemical Engineering

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