Implementation of an interprofessional team-based learning program involving seven undergraduate health and social care programs from two universities, and students' evaluation of their readiness for interprofessional learning

Lap Ki Chan, Fraide Ganotice, Kam Yuet Wong, Chak Sing Lau, Susan M. Bridges, Celia Hoi Yan Chan, Namkiu Chan, Phoebe Wing Lam Chan, Hai Yong Chen, Julie Yun Chen, Jody Kwok Pui Chu, Charlene C. Ho, Jacqueline Mei Chi Ho, Tai Pong Lam, Veronica Suk Fun Lam, Qingyun Li, Jian Gang Shen, Julian Alexander Tanner, Winnie Wan Yee Tso, Arkers Kwan Ching WongGordon Tin Chun Wong, Janet Yuen Ha Wong, Nai Sum Wong, Alan Worsley, Lei King Yu, Tin Pui Yum

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Interprofessional learning is gaining momentum in revolutionizing healthcare education. During the academic year 2015/16, seven undergraduate-entry health and social care programs from two universities in Hong Kong took part in an interprofessional education program. Based on considerations such as the large number of students involved and the need to incorporate adult learning principles, team-based learning was adopted as the pedagogy for the program, which was therefore called the interprofessional team-based learning program (IPTBL). The authors describe the development and implementation of the IPTBL program and evaluate the effectiveness of the program implementation. Methods: Eight hundred and one students, who are predominantly Chinese, participated in the IPTBL. The quantitative design (a pretest-posttest experimental design) was utilized to examine the students' gains on their readiness to engage in interprofessional education (IPE). Results: Three instructional units (IUs) were implemented, each around a clinical area which could engage students from complementary health and social care disciplines. Each IU followed a team-based learning (TBL) process: pre-class study, individual readiness assurance test, team readiness assurance test, appeal, feedback, and application exercise. An electronic platform was developed and was progressively introduced in the three IUs. The students' self-perceived attainment of the IPE learning outcomes was high. Across all four subscales of RIPLS, there was significant improvement in student's readiness to engage in interprofessional learning after the IPTBL. A number of challenges were identified: significant time involvement of the teachers, difficulty in matching students from different programs, difficulty in making IPTBL count towards a summative assessment score, difficulty in developing the LAMS platform, logistics difficulty in managing paper TBL, and inappropriateness of the venue. Conclusions: Despite some challenges in developing and implementing the IPTBL program, our experience showed that TBL is a viable pedagogy to be used in interprofessional education involving hundreds of students. The significant improvement in all four subscales of RIPLS showed the effects of the IPTBL program in preparing students for collaborative practice. Factors that contributed to the success of the use of TBL for IPE are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Article number221
JournalBMC Medical Education
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Nov 2017

Keywords

  • Adult learning principles
  • Collaborative practice
  • Evaluation
  • Interprofessional education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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