Impacts of Educational Interventions with Support of Mobile App versus Booklet for Patients with Hypertension and Metabolic Syndrome: A Secondary Data Analysis

Eliza Mi Ling Wong, Hon Lon Tam, Angela Yee Man Leung, Alice Siu Ping Cheung, Ka Ching Cheung, Doris Yin Ping Leung

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Hypertension comorbid with metabolic syndrome could increase the development of adverse cardiovascular events. Educational interventions were effective to improve outcomes in patients. Methods: This was a secondary data analysis of participants with hypertension. The original randomized controlled trial aimed to examine the effect of app and booklet versus control among individuals diagnosed with metabolic syndrome living in the community. A 30-min health education was provided to each participant. In addition to the education, the app group received a mobile app while the booklet group received a booklet. Data were collected at baseline, week 4, week 12, and week 24. Intention-to-treat principle was followed, and generalized estimating equations was employed for data analysis. Results: A total of 118 participants with hypertension and metabolic syndrome were extracted from the three-arm trial data. The sample size was 36, 42, and 40 in the app group, booklet group, and control group, respectively. Compared to the control group, the app group showed a significant reduction on body weight and waist circumference at week 24, while the total exercise and self-efficacy for exercise were increased at week 12 and week 24 but no significant findings were observed in the booklet group. Conclusions: The educational intervention supported with app was superior to the booklet support on the outcomes of body weight, waist circumference, total exercise, and self-efficacy for exercise among patients with hypertension and metabolic syndrome in the community.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12591
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume19
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022

Keywords

  • body weight
  • educational intervention
  • exercise
  • hypertension
  • metabolic syndrome
  • mhealth
  • self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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