Factors affecting direct and transfer entrants’ active coping and satisfaction with the university

Kin Cheung, Jeremy Ng, Hilda Tsang, Kelvin K.L. Pang, C. L. Johnny Wan, Kristin Moser

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Psychological wellbeing is vital to public health. University students are the future backbone of the society. Direct and transfer entrants might encounter different adjustment issues in their transition from secondary school or community college to university studies. However, worldwide, the factors affecting their active coping and satisfaction with the university are currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to address this gap. Nine-hundred-and-seventy-eight direct entrants and 841 transfer entrants, recruited by convenience sampling, completed a cross-sectional survey study in 2018. A valid and reliable Hong Kong modified Laanan-Transfer Student Questionnaire (HKML-TSQ) was used to collect data. Multiple methods of quantitative data analysis were employed, including factor analyses, test of model fit, t-tests, correlations, and linear regression. The results showed that the transfer entrants had relatively less desirable experiences in their adjusting processes than did the direct entrants. There was evidence of both common and different factors affecting the two groups’ active coping and satisfaction with the university. Different stakeholders from community colleges, universities, and student bodies should work collaboratively to improve students’ transitional experiences before, during and after admission to the university.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2803
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2020

Keywords

  • Active coping
  • Adjustment
  • Community college transfer students
  • Psychological wellbeing
  • Transition
  • University students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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