Exploratory study on the relationship between smoking and other risk behaviours among young smokers

Ka Yan Ho, Ho Cheung William Li, Katherine Ka Wai Lam, Sophia Siu Chee Chan, Man Ping Wang, Vivian Wai Fung Chan, Viveka Wei Xia, Tai Hing Lam

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To explore the relationship between smoking and other risk behaviours among Chinese young people in Hong Kong. Background: There is growing concern about coexisting risk behaviours in young smokers. Information about smoking and other risk behaviours is crucial for developing interventions to promote smoking abstinence and adoption of healthy lifestyles. The relationship between smoking and other risk behaviours among Chinese young people in Hong Kong has not been explored. Design: This is a mixed-method retrospective population-based study. Methods: A retrospective population-based study was conducted with 1,147 young smokers through Youth Quitline between November 2011–July 2016. Attitudes, behaviours and experiences related to smoking and risk behaviours among Chinese young smokers were examined in semi-structured qualitative interviews with 30 participants randomly selected from the retrospective population-based study. Results: In total, 45.5% participants reported engaging in at least one other risk behaviour. The interviews revealed that drinking alcohol may have a significant impact on quitting smoking. In addition, smoking may be a gateway for more serious risk behaviours during adolescence. Low health awareness may explain the unhealthy lifestyles among young smokers. Conclusions: This study bridges a gap in existing literature by exploring relationships between smoking and other risk behaviours among young people in Hong Kong. Relevance to clinical practice: Given the interrelationships between smoking and other risk behaviours, a holistic approach should be used to promote smoking cessation and healthy lifestyles among young smokers. If young smokers improve their health and quit smoking at the same time, their physical and mental development will benefit as a secondary outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2859-2867
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume27
Issue number13-14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adolescent health
  • attitudes
  • behaviour
  • health education
  • health risks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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