Enhancement of mechanical performance of steel/CFRP adhesively-bonded joints at elevated temperatures through carbon nanotube modification and curing

Yu Bai, Tien C. Nguyen, Chao Ding, Xiao Ling Zhao

Research output: Unpublished conference presentation (presented paper, abstract, poster)Conference presentation (not published in journal/proceeding/book)Academic researchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) has been considered as a promising approach to strengthen existing steel structures; such an adhesively-bonded system however exhibits a significant loss of stiffness and strength in an elevated temperature range. Carbon nanotube (CNT) modification and curing at elevated temperature are examined in this paper, in order to enhance the mechanical performance in the elevated temperature range. Steel/CFRP adhesively-bonded joints were prepared into four scenarios - 1) with and 2) without CNT modified epoxy adhesive cured at room temperature (20°C) and 3) with and 4) without CNT modified epoxy adhesive cured at an elevated temperature (80°C), and then tested in tension at temperatures from 20°C to 80°C. Enhancement of stiffness and strength in the elevated temperature range was not significant for the joints using CNT modified epoxy, while remarkable enhancement was found for the joints cured at the elevated temperature, comparing to those cured at room temperature.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event3rd Asia-Pacific Conference on FRP in Structures, APFIS 2012 - Sapporo, Japan
Duration: 2 Feb 20124 Feb 2012

Conference

Conference3rd Asia-Pacific Conference on FRP in Structures, APFIS 2012
Country/TerritoryJapan
CitySapporo
Period2/02/124/02/12

Keywords

  • Carbon nanotube
  • CFRP
  • Curing
  • Double Strap Joint
  • Steel
  • Temperature Effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)

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