Effects of virtual reality training on occupational performance and self-efficacy of patients with stroke: a randomized controlled trial

Yi Long, Rang ge Ouyang (Corresponding Author), Jia qi Zhang

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Virtual reality (VR) has been broadly applied in post-stroke rehabilitation. However, studies on occupational performance and self-efficacy as primary outcomes of stroke rehabilitation using VR are lacking. Thus, this study aims to investigate the effects of VR training on occupational performance and self-efficacy in patients with stroke. Methods: This was an assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Sixty participants with first-ever stroke (< 1-year onset) underwent rehabilitation in a single acute hospital. Participants were randomly assigned to either the VR group (n = 30) or control group (n = 30). Both groups received dose-matched conventional rehabilitation (i.e., 45 min, five times per week over 3 weeks). The VR group received additional 45-min VR training for five weekdays over 3 weeks. The primary outcome measures were the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and Stroke Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures included Modified Barthel Index, Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity, and Functional Test for the Hemiplegic Upper Extremity. The assessment was conducted at baseline and after the 3-week intervention. Results: A total of 52 participants (86.7%) completed the trial. Significant between-group differences in Stroke Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (Median Difference = 8, P = 0.043) and Modified Barthel Index (Median Difference = 10, P = 0.030) were found; however, no significant between-group differences in Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity, and Functional Test for the Hemiplegic Upper Extremity were noted. No serious adverse reactions related to the program were reported. Conclusions: Additional VR training could help improve the self-efficacy and activities of daily living of patients with stroke; however, it was not superior to conventional training in the improvement of upper limb functions, occupational performance, and satisfaction. Nevertheless, VR could be integrated into conventional rehabilitation programs to enhance self-efficacy of patients after stroke. Trial registration: This study was successfully registered under the title “Effects of virtual reality training on occupational performance and self-efficacy of patients with stroke” on October 13 2019 and could be located in https://www.chictr.org with the study identifier ChiCTR1900026550.

Original languageEnglish
Article number150
JournalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Occupational performance
  • Rehabilitation
  • Self-efficacy
  • Stroke
  • Virtual reality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Informatics

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