Effects of Single-Task, Dual-Task and Analogy Training during Gait Rehabilitation of Older Adults at Risk of Falling: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Toby C.T. Mak, Catherine M. Capio (Corresponding Author), Thomson W.L. Wong

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been suggested that implicit motor learning via dual-task or analogy training during gait rehabilitation may yield better outcomes in older adults by reducing the propensity for the conscious processing of movements (movement-specific reinvestment). The current study investigated the immediate effects of single-task, dual-task, and analogy training on reinvestment propensity and fall-related rehabilitation outcomes among older adults at risk of falling. Seventy-one older adults were randomly allocated to the single-task (ST), dual-task (DT), or analogy (AG) training conditions and received 12 training sessions. We assessed the reinvestment propensity, functional gait and balance, functional mobility, balance ability, single-task and dual-task walking abilities, and fear of falling at baseline (before training) and immediately after training. Our findings revealed a lack of training effect on reinvestment propensity for all groups. However, all groups displayed significant improvements in functional gait and balance (p < 0.001), functional mobility (p = 0.02), and balance ability (p = 0.01) after training. AG appeared to be superior to DT and ST, as it was the only condition that resulted in significant improvements in both single-task and dual-task walking abilities (p < 0.001). Implementing movement analogies could be a feasible and useful gait rehabilitation strategy for fall prevention and wellbeing promotion among older adults.

Original languageEnglish
Article number315
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2023

Keywords

  • analogy
  • dual-task
  • older adults
  • physical wellbeing
  • single-task

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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