Effects of rhythmic auditory stimulation on upper-limb movement speed in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders

Shu Mei Wang, Chung Ying Lin, Tracy Ho Yan Tse, Hin Lun Chu, Cheong Ho Liu, Tsz Ho Ng, Chun Kwok Tse, Wai Man Wong, Sunny Ho Wan Chan

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Movement slowness, linked to dysfunctional basal ganglia and cerebellum, is prevalent but lacks effective therapy in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. This study was to examine immediate effects of rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) on upper-limb movement speed in patients. Thirty patients and 30 psychiatrically healthy people executed the right-hand task and the both-hand task of the Purdue Pegboard Test when listening to RAS with two tempi: normal (equal to the fastest movement tempo for each participant without RAS) and fast (120% of the normal tempo). The testing order of the RAS tempi for each participant was randomized. Patients had lower scores of right-hand and both-hand tasks than did psychiatrically healthy people. Scores of right-hand and both-hand tasks were higher in the fast-RAS condition than the normal-RAS condition in participants. This is the first study to explore the possibility of applying RAS to movement therapy for patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The results demonstrated that faster RAS was effective in inducing faster upper-limb movements in patients and psychiatrically healthy people, suggesting that manipulating RAS may be a feasible therapeutic strategy utilized to regulate movement speed. The RAS may involve alternative neural pathways to modulate movement speed and thus to compensate for impaired function of basal ganglia and cerebellum in patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Auditory cue
  • Rhythmic auditory stimulation
  • Schizophrenia
  • Upper limb movement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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