Effects of functional task exercise on everyday problem-solving ability and functional status in older adults with mild cognitive impairment - A randomised controlled trial

Lawla L.F. Law (Corresponding Author), Vincent C.T. Mok, Matthew K.S. Yau, Kenneth N.K. Fong

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effect of functional task exercise on everyday problem-solving ability and functional status in older adults with mild cognitive impairment compared to single exercise or cognitive training and no treatment control. Design: A single-blind, four-arm randomised controlled trial. Setting: Out-patient clinic and community centre. Participants: Older adults with mild cognitive impairment aged ≥60 living in community. Methods: Participants (N = 145) were randomised to 8-week functional task exercise (N = 34), cognitive training (N = 38), exercise training (N = 37), or wait-list control (N = 36) group. Outcomes measures: Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination, Category Verbal Fluency Test, Trail Making Test, Problems in Everyday Living Test, Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale; Chair stand test, Berg Balance Scale, and Short Form-12 Health Survey were conducted at baseline, post-intervention and 5-months follow-up. Results: Post-intervention results of ANCOVA revealed cognitive training improved everyday problem-solving (P = 0.012) and exercise training improved functional status (P = 0.003) compared to wait-list control. Functional task exercise group demonstrated highest improvement compared to cognitive training, exercise training and wait-list control groups in executive function (P range = 0.003-0.018); everyday problem-solving (P < 0.001); functional status (P range = <.001-0.002); and physical performance (P = 0.008) at post-intervention, with all remained significant at 5-month follow-up, and further significant improvement in mental well-being (P = 0.043). Conclusions: Functional task exercise could be an effective intervention to improve everyday problem-solving ability and functional status in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. The findings support combining cognitive and exercise intervention may give additive and even synergistic effects.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberafab210
JournalAge and Ageing
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Combined training
  • Everyday problem-solving
  • Functional task exercise
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Older people
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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