Effectiveness of exergaming-based interventions for mobility and balance performance in older adults with Parkinson's disease: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

Jiaxin Zhang, Yan Luximon, Marco Y.C. Pang, Hailiang Wang (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Journal article publicationReview articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: exergaming-based interventions (EbIs) have been proposed to improve older adults' mobility and balance performance. However, the effectiveness of such interventions for older adults with Parkinson's disease (OAPD) remains unclear. Methods: seven databases (Web of Science, Medline, Academic Search Premier, CINAHL Complete, PsycINFO, PsychARTICLE and PubMed) were searched up to 7 April 2022. We assessed mobility and balance performance between EbIs groups and control groups or traditional physical training interventions (TPTIs) groups by comparing the outcomes of the Timed Up and Go (TUG), 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), gait velocity, stride length and Functional Gait Assessment (FGA). Results: we scanned 1,190 articles and meta-analysed 19 trials (sample size = 781). In general, the results revealed statistical differences between EbIs groups and TPTIs groups in the TUG [mean difference (MD) = -1.030 s; 95% confidence interval (CI) = -2.029 to -0.031; P = 0.043; high quality of evidence], 6MWT (MD = 63.483 m; 95% CI = 9.542 to 117.425; P = 0.021; moderate quality of evidence), BBS (MD = 2.129; 95% CI = -1.293 to 2.965; P < 0.001; high quality of evidence) and FGA (MD = 2.099 95% CI = -0.306 to 3.893; P = 0.022; moderate quality of evidence). No significant difference was discovered between EbIs groups and TPTIs groups in enhancing gait velocity and stride length. Conclusions: EbIs are statistically better than TPTIs in improving OAPD's performance in TUG, 6MWT, BBS and FGA, whereas only the change between EbIs and TPTIs in 6MWT can reach the value of minimal clinically important difference. Further studies are needed to better assess the effectiveness of exergaming-based interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberafac175
JournalAge and Ageing
Volume51
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2022

Keywords

  • balance performance
  • exergaming
  • mobility performance
  • older adults
  • older people
  • Parkinson's disease
  • systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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