Effect of galvanic skin resistance-aided biofeedback training in reducing the pulse rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure due to perceived stress in physiotherapy students

Tushar J. Palekar, Madhav G. Mokashi, Shahnawaz Anwer, Arjun L. Kakrani, Shilpa D. Khandare, Ahmad H. Alghadir

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of galvanic skin resistanceaided biofeedback (GSRBF) training in reducing the pulse rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure (BP) due to perceived stress in physiotherapy students. Material and Methods: Forty-three students, those having a perceived stress scale (PSS) score of 20 or more out of 40, were subjected to GSRBF training 5 days a week for 3 weeks. The outcome measures of this study were pulse rate, respiratory rate, BP, and perceived stress. Perceived stress was assessed using PSS 10. Paired t-test was used to study the changes in dependent variables over time. Results: The reduction of the pulse rate, respiratory rate, BP, and perceived stress was found to be statistically significant at the end of the trial (p<0.001). Conclusion: The GSRBF training was found to produce a significant reduction in the physiological response and perceived stress in physiotherapy students. Further, controlled research should be conducted to verify these findings and to identify the most effective stress-reducing training protocol.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-119
Number of pages4
JournalTurkiye Fiziksel Tip ve Rehabilitasyon Dergisi
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Aug 2015

Keywords

  • Biofeedback
  • Galvanic skin response
  • Perceived stress
  • Relaxation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of galvanic skin resistance-aided biofeedback training in reducing the pulse rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure due to perceived stress in physiotherapy students'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this