Depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress among Hong Kong nurses: A cross-sectional study

Teris Cheung, Paul S.F. Yip

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

94 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent epidemiological data suggests 13.3% of Hong Kong residents suffered from Common Mental Disorders, most frequently mixed anxiety and depressive disorder. This study examines the weighted prevalence and associated risk factors of depression, anxiety and stress among Hong Kong nurses. A total of 850 nurses were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Participants completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21 and multiple logistic regression was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Chronic past-year illness and poor self-perceived mental health were significant correlates of past-week depression, anxiety and stress. It confirmed further positive correlations between depression and divorce, widowhood and separation, job dissatisfaction, disturbance with colleagues, low physical activity levels and sleep problems. Marital status; general medicine; sleep problems, and a lack of leisure significantly correlated with anxiety. Stress was significantly associated with younger age, clinical inexperience, past-year disturbance with colleagues, low physical activity, no leisure and drinking alcohol. Nurses were more depressed, anxious and stressed than the local general population, with over one-third of our respondents classified as subject to these disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11072-11100
Number of pages29
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Sep 2015

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Epidemiology
  • Mental health
  • Nurses
  • Prevalence
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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