Depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress among baccalaureate nursing students in Hong Kong: A cross-sectional study

Teris Cheung, Siu Yi Wong, Kit Yi Wong, Lap Yan Law, Karen Ng, Man Tik Tong, Ka Yu Wong, Man Ying Ng, Paul S.F. Yip

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the prevalence of depression, anxiety and symptoms of stress among baccalaureate nursing students in Hong Kong. Recent epidemiological data suggest that the prevalence of mild to severe depression, anxiety and stress among qualified nurses in Hong Kong stands at 35.8%, 37.3% and 41.1%, respectively. A total of 661 nursing students were recruited to participate in our cross-sectional mental health survey using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Working in general medicine, being in financial difficulty, having sleep problems, not having leisure activity and perceiving oneself in poor mental health were significant correlates of past-week depression, anxiety and stress. Year of study, physical inactivity and family crisis in the past year correlated significantly with depression. Imbalanced diets significantly correlated withanxiety. Stress was significantly associated with a lack of alone time. This is the first study to confirm empirically that clinical specialty, financial difficulties and lifestyle factors can increase nursing students’ levels of depression and anxiety and symptoms of stress. Prevention, including the early detection and treatment of mental disorder, promises to reduce the prevalence of these indicators among this group.
Original languageEnglish
Article number779
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Aug 2016

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • DASS 21
  • Depression
  • Epidemiology
  • Mental health education
  • Nursing students
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this