Delivering a Music Intervention in a Randomized Controlled Trial Involving Older People With Dementia: Musician Experiences and Reflections

S. Harrison, M. Cooke, W. Moyle, Ho Keung David Shum, J. Murfield

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A qualitative thematic approach was used to explore musicians' views and experiences of delivering a music intervention and its efficacy for people with dementia in long-term care. Two musicians who delivered the intervention in a randomized controlled trial were interviewed using a semistructured schedule. The data were sorted, categorized, and thematically analyzed. Two themes emerged: design of the protocol and efficacy of the program. Musicians felt that the intervention was appropriately designed, particularly in terms of repertoire selection, session length, incorporation of live and prerecorded music, and use of 2 musicians. They reported seeing improvements in mood, memory, general well-being, and quality of life for persons with dementia, both during and after the session. The findings support a music protocol structure that can be used for randomized controlled trials. They also highlight how standardized assessment tools used in randomized controlled trials can be complemented with qualitative, reflective evidence. © 2010, The Author(s). All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)214-218
Number of pages5
JournalMusic & Medicine
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • music protocol
  • musicians
  • qualitative
  • randomized controlled trial
  • training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Music
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this