Defocused Images Change Multineuronal Firing Patterns in the Mouse Retina

Seema Banerjee, Qin Wang, Chung Him So, Feng Pan (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

Myopia is a major public health problem, affecting one third of the population over 12 years old in the United States and more than 80% of people in Hong Kong. Myopia is attributable to elongation of the eyeball in response to defocused images that alter eye growth and refraction. It is known that the retina can sense the focus of an image, but the effects of defocused images on signaling of population of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that account either for emmetropization or refractive errors has still to be elucidated. Thorough knowledge of the underlying mechanisms could provide insight to understanding myopia. In this study, we found that focused and defocused images can change both excitatory and inhibitory conductance of ON alpha, OFF alpha and ON-OFF retinal ganglion cells in the mouse retina. The firing patterns of population of RGCs vary under the different powers of defocused images and can be affected by dopamine receptor agonists/antagonists' application. OFF-delayed RGCs or displaced amacrine cells (dACs) with time latency of more than 0.3 s had synchrony firing with other RGCs and/or dACs. These spatial synchrony firing patterns between OFF-delayed cell and other RGCs/dACs were significantly changed by defocused image, which may relate to edge detection. The results suggested that defocused images induced changes in the multineuronal firing patterns and whole cell conductance in the mouse retina. The multineuronal firing patterns can be affected by dopamine receptors' agonists and antagonists. Synchronous firing of OFF-delayed cells is possibly related to edge detection, and understanding of this process may reveal a potential therapeutic target for myopia patients.
Original languageEnglish
Article number530
Number of pages19
JournalCells
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Feb 2020

Keywords

  • amacrine cell
  • ganglion cell
  • gap junction
  • myopia
  • retina

Cite this