Cyclic stress–strain rate-dependent response of rubberised concrete

B. Xu, D. V. Bompa, A. Y. Elghazouli

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents an experimental investigation into the constitutive response of rubberised concrete materials under monotonic and cyclic compression. After describing the test specimens and experimental arrangement, a detailed account of the stress–strain response of rubberised concrete materials, as well as their reference high strength conventional concrete, is given. The volumetric rubber content is varied between 0 and 40% of both fine and coarse aggregates. Both monotonic and cyclic loading conditions are considered for comparison, and three strain rate levels, simulating static, moderate and severe seismic action, are examined. The increase in rubber content is shown to have a detrimental effect on the stiffness and strength, as expected. However, with the increase in rubber content, rubberised concrete materials are shown to exhibit improved compressive recovery under cyclic loading, coupled with a higher energy accumulation rate, enhanced inter-cycle stability and lower inter-cycle degradation. It is also shown that the increase in strain rate, from static to severe seismic, leads to a notable increase in the stiffness and strength, with these enhancements becoming less significant with the increase in rubber content. Based on the results and observations, expressions for determining the unloading stiffness and residual strain, as a function of rubber content and strain rate, are proposed within the ranges considered. The suggested relationships enable the characterisation of rubberised concrete materials within widely used cyclic constitutive models.

Original languageEnglish
Article number119253
JournalConstruction and Building Materials
Volume254
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Sept 2020

Keywords

  • Cyclic compression
  • Energy dissipation
  • Inter-cycle degradation
  • Rubberised concrete
  • Stress–strain response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • General Materials Science

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