Critical success factors for PPPs in infrastructure developments: Chinese perspective

Ping Chuen Chan, Tsun Ip Lam, Wai Ming Chan, Esther Cheung, Yongjian Ke

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

208 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the rapid growth of the Chinese economy, the desperate demand for infrastructure developments has created bottlenecks in the country's sustainable development. Infrastructure investment could not be funded completely by the government alone. Taking Beijing as an example, there will be about 2,400 infrastructure projects to be developed during 2006-2010 with a total investment of over RMB 470 billion, which may impose budgetary pressure on the government. As a result, public-private partnership (PPP) could be considered as a favorable option to help provide these rapidly demanded public works and services. In order to investigate the potential for adopting PPPs in the People's Republic of China, this paper aims to explore the critical success factors (CSFs) necessary to conduct PPP projects. The views from Chinese experts were collected via an empirical questionnaire survey. The respondents were invited to rate a total of 18 CSFs that contribute to the success of PPP projects as gleaned from the contemporary literature. The results of this survey were analyzed by the factor analysis technique. The findings showed that the 18 CSFs could be grouped into five underlying factors including: Factor 1-stable macroeconomic environment; Factor 2-shared responsibility between public and private sectors; Factor 3-transparent and efficient procurement process; Factor 4-stable political and social environment; and Factor 5-judicious government control.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)484-494
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Construction Engineering and Management
Volume136
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Apr 2010

Keywords

  • China
  • Infrastructure
  • Partnerships
  • Private sector
  • Procurement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Industrial relations
  • Strategy and Management

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