Contribution of aquatic products consumption to total human exposure to PAHs in Eastern China: The source matters

Qian Wang, Lanlan Chu, Fei Peng, Juan Ying Li, Hongjie Chen, Ling Jin

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Demand for aquatic products surges, due to the increasing concerns on high-quality nutrition and food security. Eastern China is the leading area in contributing significantly to both production and consumption of aquatic products from inland aquaculture, coastal fishing, and distant-water fishing. It is imperative to comprehensively assess the dietary risks of common chemical hazards, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aquatic products of these supply origins, and the contribution of aquatic product consumption to total human exposure. The observed body loads of total PAHs in the coastal aquatic products varied significantly, indicating an unstable food quality from the east coast of China. In the meantime, benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentrations (BaPeq) exhibited the highest level in the aquatic products from inland farm ponds. High BaPeq, along with high consumption of inland aquaculture products, led to higher corresponding cumulative carcinogenic risks (ILCRs) than the other two kinds of products, which further indicate that the origins and consumption rates of the aquatic products do matter. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the consumption of aquatic products is an important contributor to the total daily exposure to PAHs, especially for children and pregnant women. Finally, it is necessary to apply practical remediation in aquaculture farm ponds to provide high-quality products, especially for the population groups of children and pregnant women, and alleviate the exposure and risk due to the PAHs in aquatic products.

Original languageEnglish
Article number115339
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume266
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2020

Keywords

  • Aquaculture
  • Aquatic products
  • Cancer risk
  • Dietary intake
  • Human exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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