Computational simulation of transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced electric fields in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of heavy cannabis using individuals

Jiaqi Zhang (Corresponding Author), Zhongfei Bai, Dalinda Isabel Sanchez Vidana, Janna Cousijn, Kenneth N. K. Fong

Research output: Journal article publicationJournal articleAcademic researchpeer-review

Abstract

We aimed to investigate the influence of demographic and clinical modulators on the strength of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-induced electric fields (EFs) in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (lDLPFC) in heavy cannabis using individuals. Structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans of 20 heavy cannabis using individuals and 22 non-cannabis users (the controls) in the age range of 18–25 were retrieved. Computational simulations of TMS-induced EFs in the lDLPFC were performed. No significant difference in the strength of TMS-induced EFs was observed between heavy cannabis using individuals and the controls. A negative correlation between the scalp-to-cortex distance demonstrated and the strength of the induced EFs. The severity of cannabis use related problems did not correlate with the induced EFs in the lDLPFC of heavy cannabis using individuals. However, the severity of alcohol use related problems was negatively correlated with the induced EF in the lDLPFC localized by the 5-cm method in the whole sample. Early adulthood seems related to an increase in the induced EFs in the lDLPFC. In conclusion, the dominant factor influencing TMS-induced EFs was the scalp-to-cortex distance. In early adulthood, the interaction between age and comorbid substance use may influence with the magnitude of TMS-induced EFs, thereby complicating the treatment effect of TMS in young people with substance use disorders.
Original languageEnglish
Article number103963
JournalAsian Journal of Psychiatry
Volume93
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2024

Keywords

  • Cannabis
  • Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex
  • Scalp-to-cortex distance
  • Simulation
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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